The crisis in Lebanon and what I’m going to do about it.

EDITORS NOTE: This blog was written before the Muskathlon trip in May, 2017. Therefore in it I ask for support and prayer. The trip is over, but if you feel like supporting Open Door’s ministry in Syria, go to https://www.opendoors.org.au/get-involved/projects-and-appeals/. Cheers!

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 Lebanon_2016_0260102313
The Syrian and Iraqi civil wars have affected many people. Obviously the millions of people displaced and/or fleeing due to the conflict were the hardest hit and should be thought of first. But think also of the many nations whom have had these refugees rush in – and sometimes through – for protection and freedom from war and persecution. Many millions of people have been affected by this crisis and it has created a very complex situation. For this argument, and since I’m travelling there, I’ll focus on Lebanon.From what I’ve read about Lebanon and Syria, two bordering nations, there is a lot of bad blood due to religious persecution and other conflict. An Open Doors interview of a Lebanese pastor quotes him saying, “We have a history with Syria—they occupied our land and destroyed everything, creating a hatred in our hearts towards Muslims and towards Syrians.”

Lebanon_2014_0260010113

Not only that, but imagine if a fifth (over 4 million) of the population of Australia of refugees flooded over here, seeking food, shelter and jobs. We might be crippled as a nation.

Well consider Lebanon. It has an area of 10,452 km²*, and before the war it held 4 million people. Now it holds over 5 million due to refugees. The pastor speaks on this: “They create a very big burden for our economy. They are seen as taking our jobs, that is why the people don’t want them. I see that many Lebanese are not helping them. That means they end up living in tents in the camps, in garage boxes, or three or four families together in a small apartment. Many knock at our door for help, begging for whatever help we can give in their difficult situation.”

It’s not an easy road for anyone there. But it’s not hopeless. Churches are taking on massive projects to bear the load and share God’s love with the refugees. Border camps have been set up to take on the flow. Schools and food and supply rounds are being run. Much is being done, and much more is necessary.

 

So here I’m stepping in to change the world! Well, maybe just Lebanon and maybe just a very small portion of it. I have no thoughts of grandeur here; the job is massive and I’m one person. But I can’t let this situation pass me by. I must do something about it. I must support the Church in it’s role of God’s hands and feet in a place of crisis and hate.

My trip is paid all by me (with some support from Open Doors), and so all the money raised through this fund-raiser will be used in Lebanon. Primarily the money will go towards food packages as well as other emergency relief items to be delivered to refugee camps there. A smaller portion will go towards Open Doors materials which teach the gospel of Jesus.

Lebanon_2016_0260102311

As with most wise charities, I have been told by my team leader we won’t be bringing in any provisions/materials from Australia. We’ll let the experts who know how best to use the funds to do the shopping.

Please support me in any way you can! Whether it’s through funds or prayer or getting informed and telling others, I will appreciate it so much. Hit the big red button to donate and share this story on the socials (like Facebook). Thanks for reading!

Have you any more questions about the Muskathlon and Open Doors? Click here to be briefed on most of the trip details you need to know.

*For size comparison, Perth’s area is 5,386 km², and much of our land is habitable.

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